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Summer Workouts



I'm still working on setting up a pitching clinic, but it will have to wait until next week, probably Weds the 23rd.
I'll send an update as soon as I know for sure.
 


by posted 08/16/2017
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by posted 08/14/2017
Register Online

Fall Ball registration will be closing in the next week or so,
we need to have teams rosters set by the end of the month.
 

 

Online Registration

is Open For Fall Ball 2017


by posted 08/14/2017
Board Elections for 2018

Board Elections will be held at our September meeting (TBA).

We need your help to keep our league going as well as growing.  
Nearly all of our Board positions are voted on every year, but this year it is especially crucial to get additional volunteers.  We have board members who have been stepping up to the plate for us for a number of years who will be stepping down at the end of this Little League year. The current Board will be voting to fill the 2018 Board positions in our September meeting (TBA) so the new Board can start in October. Please consider taking a leadership role this year.

Below are the Little League descriptions of the major Board Roles.



Little League BOARD OF DIRECTORS ROLES

 

The local league Board of Directors, elected from and by the adult members of the league, is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the league within the rules, regulations and policies of Little League. This board does not have the authority to alter, suspend or change any of the rules, regulations or policies of Little League.

However, wide latitude is given to this board in many areas of operation so that the local needs of the community may be met. For instance, the local league board of directors is entirely responsible for choosing a method for selection of Tournament Teams (or "All Stars").

Annually, the regular membership of each Little League is required to meet and elect the board of directors. Following the election, the board of directors meets to elect its officers from within the newly elected board. The officers required are: president, vice president, secretary, treasurer, player agent, and safety officer and coaching coordinator (Information officer recommended but not required).

The board may adopt such rules and regulations for the conduct of its meetings and the management of the league as it may deem proper. The board has the power to discipline, suspend or remove any director or officer or committee member of the league, subject to provisions of the local league constitution.

Members of the local league board of directors, particularly the officers, should not be involved as members of other boards when such membership may cause a conflict of interest.

 

President - 
Apart from all other considerations, sound leadership, couched in knowledge, experience and common sense, is the greatest requirement and most exemplary qualification of the man or woman selected as president of a Little League.

While efficient organizational and administrative abilities are desirable credentials, the search for good leadership must transcend all other attributes in the adult who gives direction to the Little League movement in the local community. Dedication to the goals and purpose of Little League is inherent in the volunteer aspect of those who serve, but not everyone who serves is gifted with the quality of leadership. Presidents must reflect these qualities if they are to be of benefit to children.

The president has many responsibilities in the administration of the league. Each President is elected by, and is accountable to, the local league board of directors. Duties of a president are described within the limits of the rules and regulations, and within the local league constitution, giving each president the ability to oversee the affairs of all elements of the league.

As the chief administrator, the president selects and appoints managers, coaches, umpires and committees. As such, no person becomes a manager, coach, umpire or committee member without the approval of the president. However, all appointments are subject to final approval by the local league's board of directors.

Importantly, the president is the officer with whom Little League International maintains contact. The president also represents the league in the District organization.

The president should be the most informed officer of the league. Each president must know the regulations under which Little League operates and in authorizing the annual application for charter, binds all members of the league to faithfully observe the regulations. Little League Baseball International Headquarters reserves the right to require a league to remove any officer who does not carry out the terms of charter application. Serious violation can result in loss of the league's charter by action of the Charter Committee in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Beyond the requirements of league administration, the president should personify the best public image in reflection to the community at large. Each president should take an active role in gaining support and winning friends for the league program.

The president presides at league meetings, and assumes full responsibility for the operation of the local league. The president receives all mail, supplies and other communications from the Little League Headquarters. A president may manage, coach or umpire, provided he/she does not serve on the protest committee, nor serve as tournament team manager or coach.

 

Vice President - 
The vice president presides in the absence of the president, works with other officers and committee members, is ex-officio member of all committees, and carries out such duties and assignments as may be delegated by the president. Separate vice presidents may also be selected to oversee individual divisions within the league. If so, one vice president should be selected as the one to preside in the absence of the president. A vice president may manage, coach or umpire, provided they do not serve on the protest committee.

 

Secretary -
The secretary maintains a register of members and directors, records the minutes of meetings, is responsible for sending out notice of meetings, issues membership cards and maintains a record of league's activities.

 

Treasurer -
The treasurer signs checks co-signed by another officer or director (or as directed by the local league's constitution), dispenses league funds as approved by the board of directors, reports on the status of league funds, keeps local league books and financial records, prepares budgets, and assumes the responsibility for all local league finances.

 

Player Agent -
The player agent conducts annual tryouts, is in charge of player selection, assists the president in checking birth records and eligibility of players and generally supervises and coordinates the transfer of players to or from the Minor Leagues according to provisions of the regulations of Little League Baseball. Separate player agents may also be selected to oversee individual divisions within the league. The player agent must not manage, coach or umpire in the division over which he/she has authority, unless the local league has received explicit written permission to allow this from Little League International.

 

Safety Officer -
The safety officer coordinates all safety activities including supervision of ASAP (A Safety Awareness Program), ensures safety in player training, ensures safe playing conditions, coordinates reporting and prevention of injuries, solicits suggestions for making conditions safer, and reports suggestions to Little League International through the ASAP system.

 

Coaching Coordinator -
Represents coaches/managers in league; presents a coach/manager training budget to the board; gains the support and funds necessary to implement a league-wide training program; orders and distributes training materials to players, coaches and managers; coordinates mini-clinics as necessary; helps implement www.LittleLeagueCoach.org as the manager-coach education program for the league.

 

Information Officer (recommended but not required) -
The information officer manages the league's official home page on active.com, manages the online registration process and ensures that league rosters are maintained on the site, assigns administrative rights to league volunteers and teams, ensures that league news and scores are updated on a regular basis, collects, posts and distributes important information on League activities including direct dissemination of fund-raising and sponsor activities to Little League International, district, public, league members and media, serves as primary contact person for Little League and active.com regarding optimizing use of the Internet for league administration and for distributing information to league members and to Little League International, and displays enthusiasm for using the Internet for league administration, for sharing information and for creating a more enjoyable and efficient Little League experience.

 

Concession Manager (recommended but not required) -

Maintains the operation of concession facilities

Organizes the purchase of concession products

Responsible for the management of the concession sales at league events

Schedules volunteers to work the concession booth during league events

Collects and reviews concession related offers including coupons, discounts and bulk-purchasing opportunities

Organizes, tallies and keeps records of concession sales and purchases

 

Sponsorship/Fundraising Manager (recommended but not required) -

Solicits and secures local sponsorships to support league operations

Collects and reviews sponsorship and fundraising opportunities

Organizes and implements approved league fundraising activities

Coordinates participation in fundraising activities

Maintains records of monies secured through sponsorship and fundraising initiatives

 

Head Umpire/Chief Umpire (UIC) (recommended but not required) -

Provides Umpire Training

Schedules Umpires

Member of Protest Committee

 


by posted 08/07/2017
The Importance of Playing Catch

Coaches and Parents, please share this with your players.

I stress this (almost) all the time as I watch players warming up with no focus on what they're doing. Warm-ups are when every throw and every catch should be perfect because ther is no pressure. It is the one time you can work on your mechanics. I often tell them I would rather they make 15 really good throws than 50 throws just going through the motions. 
Even chatting with your partner, you should be able to put enough focus on your warm-ups to make good throws and recieve that ball rather than standing there like a lump and expecting the ball to fly into your glove. 
As an FYI, I highly recommend checking out anything you find online from Sue Enquist, Big Al Baseball and Morgan Stuart and her partners at The Packaged Deal. The following article is from Morgan Stuart.


If the most important part about defense is PLAYING CATCH, why are we still so bad at it??
Most defensive plays (those that aren't strike outs or pop ups) require a team to be able to 
1. Catch the ball 2. Throw the ball and 3. Catch the ball again... Playing Catch IS Defense. 
Too many times, in practice or pre-game, players go through the motions--Dropping balls, overthrowing them, and not paying attention to the adjustments that can be made each rep. This drives me CRAZY. Especially when those same players ask their coaches after practice-- "Coach, what can I work on?"
Be aware of what you're teaching your body to do. Take pride in how you practice the little things (move your feet when catching the ball, hit your partner in the chest, maintain your balance when throwing).
We should EXPECT to make a good throw and to catch the ball (without REACHING) every single time- especially in practice. That's what's expected of us in the game-- WHEN THE PRESSURE IS ON.
When you're not rushed, when there's no base runner, when there's no game on the line-- an accurate throw and a sure catch should be rehearsed. Over and over.
We are bad at playing CATCH because players find it boring, unchallenging, monotonous. If it's really not that hard, why aren't we perfect at it yet?
If we really DO understand the importance of it-- we should strive to be perfect when throwing and receiving. Those things are the most controllable things in our game.
October 21 at 12:10pm · 
Morgan Stuart- Get Defensive


by posted 10/23/2016
Tips for the First Time Coach



Click HERE for Tips for the First Time Coach
note: this is a PDF file


by posted 04/04/2016
Concussion info


Click here for the Concussion Fact sheet



Please follow the link below to review the laws governing concussions in youth sports in CT..

http://www.littleleague.org/learn/programs/childprotection/concussions/ConcussionsConnecticut.htm

 

Here is the link to the CDC concussion in youth sports webpage:

http://www.cdc.gov/headsup/youthsports/index.html

 

Click here for some of the CDC's Concussion Docs


by posted 02/20/2016
5 Crucial Decisions For Softball Success

“5 Crucial Decisions For Softball Success” Written By John Michael Kelly

As the spring softball season approaches, whether high school, travel or recreational I’d like you to pause for a moment and consider all the decisions your athlete has to make during the course of a game, and how little time she really has to make those decisions and react to ball, pitch or play. A typical batter has less than 1/2 second to determine pitch velocity, movement of the ball and ultimate spot to place the barrel of the bat each swing. No small feat! The same crazy quick time pressured decisions are true for fielding and base running.

Ultimately your athlete’s or team’s level of on the field success is dictated by the decisions she/they make. And these decisions are a product of many factors, most all of which are found within her head.

Behind every action is an emotion; behind every emotion is a thought. So how can you insure that your athlete or team thinks and feels optimally so that she/they make good decisions on the field?

1. Decide to play in the MOMENT. – Dwelling on past mistakes or worrying about future ones makes focusing on the task at hand impossible. “Be Here Now,” and watch decision making improve immediately.

2. Decide to NOT make any one mistake/at bat or play more important than it needs to be. – The athlete decides in her head how much power she gives any one “event” on the field. The more power she gives it the bigger it gets in her head; the less power she gives it the sooner the mistake fades away.

3. Decide to always practice with a clearly defined PURPOSE in mind. – Building confidence and making good decisions is the result of proper preparation, for competence breeds confidence.

4. Decide to focus on the PROCESS of getting better instead of your batting average, ERA, fielding % or wins and losses. – Learning to focus on EFFORT and refraining from self-judgment is always the best recipe for a quick bounce back after a mistake on the field.

5. Decide to take RESPONSIBILITY for your thinking and emotional state on the field. – Success happens by design, not by accident so come into a game with a plan, ready to face those adversity demons head on!

In truth so many poor decisions on the field are due to doubt and hesitation, a fear of making a mistake. If your athlete or team can implement these five decisions and you as parent or coach support them you will soon see infinitely better game decision making, better performance levels and a greater joy for playing the game!

Thanks for reading!
John Michael Kelly

John Michael Kelly, America’s Sports Confidence Coach, is known for skyrocketing the self-confidence and game performance levels for thousands of youth athletes and teams from coast to coast by reducing the stress and increasing the joy for playing the game! John also coaches travel softball with the 18u and 18 Gold teams for The Next Level (“TNL”) organization in sunny San Diego. You can follow John at SoftballSmarts.com and Facebook.com/SoftballSmarts. 

from Fastpitch.tv


by posted 08/26/2015
5 steps to a GREAT at-bat!

softballspot.com
Softball Drills and Coaching Tips 

5 steps to a GREAT at-bat! 

Here's a quick 5-step routine that will help your hitters quiet the noise and 
let their muscle memory take over at the plate... 

1. In the Hole 
Begin getting ready early so as not to feel rushed. 
Stretch and prepare by using relaxation techniques and positive visualization. 
Recall any pertinent information about the pitcher. 
Check-in to access your present state of mind and use a relaxation technique to calm fears. 

2. on Deck 
Finalize your hitting plan in your head and visualize a successful at-bat. 
While using self-talk, take a few practice swings to determine the pitcher's timing. 
Check your emotional level again and stay in control. 

3. Before the At-Bat 
Get the sign from the coach and visualize a successful swing. 
Complete all preparatory actions in the hitting routine. 

4. In the Box 
Relax with deep controlled breathing to transition to the muscle memory stage. 
Right before the pitch take a deep breath and release slowly. 
Suck in a little air right as the pitcher reaches the point of release. 

5. After Each Pitch 
Step out of the batter's box while checking-in mentally. 
Get rid of any negative talk or feelings. 
Make visual adjustments and use the hitting routine again to prepare for the next pitch. 

Check it out here: 
http://softballspot.com/sp/mentalhitting/ 


by posted 06/09/2015
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